Impact of Study Abroad vs. Overseas Internship

Excerpt:

For students who hope to gain the most career impact from study abroad, results indicate that they should choose an internship as part of their curriculum. Remarkably, 70 percent of intern respondents reported that study abroad ignited interest in a career direction pursued after the experience, compared to 60 percent of non-intern respondents. In addition, 83 percent said that it allowed them to acquire skill sets that influenced their career path, compared to 75 percent who did not intern.

Although there is not always a significant statistical difference between students who attended local university classes and those who did not, it is important to mention that students who attended courses at the local university did experience greater long-term language benefits and were more likely to work or volunteer abroad than their counterparts. The biggest difference between the two groups is in the area of relationships. Of those who attended local university classes, 31 percent still maintain contact with host-country friends, compared to 16 percent of respondents who did not study at the local university.

more here: http://www.transitionsabroad.com/publications/magazine/0403/benefits_study_abroad.shtml

Canadian B-Schools Leading Out on Internationalization

Excerpt:

At Canadian universities, business schools are light-years ahead
of the rest of the campus in raising their global profile.

Intensive foreign-student-recruitment efforts, friendly Canadian
immigration rules, mandatory study-abroad requirements, and, in
some cases, the option to pursue programs in multiple languages
have combined to pack a punch in recent years.

More here: http://chronicle.com/article/In-Canada-Business-Schools/131388/

Both Science and Liberal Arts Are Required for 21st Century Says President of Duke U.

Excerpt:

“We also need to make clear that in
promoting the humanities, we are not deriding the sciences or encouraging
trade-offs between the two. For the health of our society, we need to train
minds that have learned plural disciplines and can move freely among them.  Our colleagues in China and Singapore are
trying to figure out the mysterious secret of liberal arts education, the
broad-based, integrative training spanning the arts and sciences which they see
as producing America’s adaptive, inventive kind of leader. It will be ironic if we fail to
nourish and protect this asset just when others are recognizing its value.

To develop fully, skills in language, the arts and social inquiry must
start being built at early ages, then broadened and deepened in further stages
of schooling.  Too often, the segments of
this educational pathway are quite detached from each other, with fragmenting
results at best.”

More here: http://today.duke.edu/2012/03/humanitiestalk

Former CEO of Lockheed Martin Comments in WSJ on the Necessity of Humanistic Study for Engineers

Excerpt:
“In fact, students who are exposed to more modern methods of history
education–where critical thinking and research are emphasized–tend to
perform better in math and science. As a case in point, students who
participate in National History Day–actually a year-long program that
gets students in grades 6-12 doing historical research–consistently
outperform their peers on state standardized tests, not only in social
studies but in science and math as well.

In my position as CEO of a firm
employing over 80,000 engineers, I can testify that most were excellent
engineers–but the factor that most distinguished those who advanced in
the organization was the ability to think broadly and read and write
clearly.”

More here: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424053111904265504576568351324914730.html

Liberal Arts in the 21st Century

Excerpts:

The first, most practical defense is that the liberal arts (and
sciences) are the best possible preparation for success in the learned
professions–law, medicine, teaching–as well as in the less traditionally
learned but increasingly arcane professions of business, finance, and
high-tech innovation.

It’s insurance against obsolescence; in any rapidly changing field (and
every field is changing rapidly these days), if you only focus on
learning specific materials that are pertinent in 2012, rather than
learning about them in a broader context, you will soon find that your
training will have become valueless. Most important, with a liberal
education you will have learned how to learn, so that you will be able
to do research to answer questions in your field that will come up years
from now, questions that nobody could even have envisioned in 2012,
much less taught you how to answer.

more here: http://chronicle.com/article/The-Liberal-Arts-as-Guideposts/130475/